Stop Your Treadmill From Beeping DIY

Stop Your Treadmill From Beeping DIY


[LOUD, OBNOXIOUS BEEPING] I’m going to show you how to get rid of this dreadful beeping in your treadmill. I’ll give you a few options. In order of simplicity they are: 1) Muffle the sound, if you just find it too loud. 2) Permanently remove the speaker. 3) Add a switch so you can turn the sound on and off. or 4) Add a volume control, or like I ultimately did, add a combination volume control with switch. This is a bottom of the line treadmill we bought on sale for about $400 a few years ago. There is nothing terribly special about it. But even if you have a fancy treadmill, the components are still fairly simple. So you should be able to apply these instructions to your model. We’ll start on the back of the panel. Remove the cover where the wires go in. On this model you can actually see the speaker from here. More specifically, that electrical component is called a buzzer. When you feed it electricity it beeps. It’s a black round thing with a hole in the middle. That’s what we see here. If you want to muffle the sound you can shove something in there, like maybe a sponge or a sock that will cover the speaker and make it just a little bit quieter. If that’s all you want to do then we’re done here. But I’m going to keep going. Next I’ll remove all the screws on the back. Don’t worry about the screws holding the wire. With all the screws out, the front comes right off. Just disconnect the connector for the safety switch and the whole thing is loose. Here’s a good look at the circuit board and the buzzer, right there. Again if all you want to do is a muffle the sound then tape something thick over top of that and put it back together. If you want to permanently disable the sound, we need to remove the buzzer. That would usually be done with a soldering iron. But if you don’t have one you can just… uh, destroy it! Destroy the buzzer. Put some pliers in there and start tearing it apart. Just make sure not to damage the circuit board. Another option is, if there happens to be some space between the buzzer and the board, You may be able to rock it back and forth until the pins break. But a safer option is to use a soldering iron, which I have. So I’m going to remove the circuit board so i can get under it. Start by removing all the screws holding it in. Then remove any connectors or ribbons going into the board. On the other side of the board locate the two pins that belong to the buzzer. Then we can use our soldering iron to remove the buzzer. You can’t see my other hand here, but as I heat one pin, I’m pulling that side of the buzzer off the board. Go back and forth a few times until both pins are free. If you’re comfortable permanently disabling the sound when you’re done now. Just put everything back together. Maybe tape the speaker to the inside of the panel so you can put it back on if you ever decide to sell it. But the sound can be useful sometimes, as it warns you when the speed is changing, for example, if you use the pre-configured workouts. So if you want the option to have the sound but you want to disable it, say, when the kids are in bed, Then I’ll show you how to do that. In the description below, there’s a link to my blog at gabeshacks.com where you’ll find wiring diagrams for each option I describe here. There are two ways to go about it. Those are options 3 and 4 that we talked about earlier. We could use a simple switch. Any kind of switch will do. I’ll put a link in the description to an example switch that’s just push on/push off, but they’re very cheap to buy even locally at an electronics store. You could even pillage switch off something you don’t want anymore. The other option is to add a volume knob. You do that with this: a potentiometer, which we’ll use a variable resistor. I made a mistake of not measuring the amount of resistance I need to quiet this thing. So I guessed at it, and I bought a one kilo-ohm potentiometer. I was wrong. This does make a difference to the volume, but hardly any. I had a 10 kilo-ohm potentiometer that wasn’t suitable for this project, but at least allowed me to test. That did make a very significant dent in the volume, but not quite all the way down to silence. So if you’re going to rely only on a potentiometer to bring down the volume all the way to silent. I suggest you use a 20 kilo-ohm potentiometer. There’s a link to one in the description of the video. But again, these are fairly inexpensive locally too. Now I’m combining the two options here. This potentiometer has a built-in switch. Two pins are for the switch, and the other three make up a normal potentiometer. So I can lower the volume and click it completely off So even though I bought the wrong thing and this particular potentiometer can’t significantly lower the volume, it’s still useful to me. If you’re going to go this route than 10 kilo-ohms resistance would work just fine since you can rely on the switch to shut it right off. Again, I’ll put a link in the description to one of these. To hook this up we’ll need some wires. I pillaged some wire from some scrap network cable. You can’t see in the video, but one of the pads where the speaker was soldered to has a plus sign. That’s the positive. We’re going to start with the negative side and wire it directly to the buzzer. This piece of wire needs to be long enough to allow you to place the buzzer away from the circuit board. Now with another wire, half as long as the first, solder it to the positive side. The other end of the wire gets soldered to one of the pins of the switch. If you’re using just a plain switch, then the wire coming away from the switch can be soldered to the buzzer. But that’s not what I’m doing. I’ll need to connect a short wire from the other side of the switch into the potentiometer. We only need to use two of the three pins of the potentiometer: the middle one and one of the other ones. But which other one we choose will dictate how the dial works. The way I’m wiring it will allow you to turn it counterclockwise to turn it down, which is what you’d expect since it clicks off all the way counterclockwise. If you’re using a regular potentiometer with no switch, then your wire will come from the circuit board directly to this pin. With another wire connect the middle pin to the positive pin on the buzzer. Now all the wiring is done. You’ll need to decide where to put the potentiometer. On this model there is a heartbeat sensor, which never works properly, but it’s round too and I think it would look cleanest if the volume dial is exactly opposite that. So i need to find that spot on the back. Of course it’s directly under one of these cross braces that’s there for, you know, strength, So obviously I’ll just break it off and assume nothing bad will happen. Now I’ve measured and marked where I want it to be, so I’ll start drilling. I’m starting with a small drill bit to make sure I get the hole exactly where I want it. Then I’ll follow up with the size I actually need. Use a drill bit that’s just a little bigger than the switch or potentiometer you’re using. Then clean it up with a blade. Now we can put the circuit board back in place. Potentiometers come with a tab sticking up beside the knob. There’s supposed to be a hole that can fit in Tthis prevents the whole potentiometer from rotating when you rotate the knob. But I’m just going to break it off and rely on the nut to keep it still. Next we can find a home for the buzzer. It’s actually fairly snug in this spot already, but I’ll add some hot glue just make sure. Next, put all the screws back in and replace the ribbon and any other connectors. Feed the potentiometer through the hole and turn it over. While holding it in place from underneath put the washer and nut on. I underestimated the thickness of this plastic and I don’t have room for the washer. So i’m just using the nut. It shouldn’t matter. With a wrench or socket, tighten down the nut. Make sure the potentiometer is turned all the way down and add the knob so the line is at the 7 o’clock position. Many knobs will just press on, but this one has a set screw. Now it’s time to put everything back together. Connect the safety switch and set the panel down in place. Around back, connect the main connector and put the cover back on. Then put all the screws back. Now is the moment of truth. I’ll turn it on with the volume all the way up first. [LOUD, OBNOXIOUS BEEPING] That’s the sound we know and hate. Now I’ll turn the volume all the way down but not off. [SLIGHTLY QUIETER BEEPING] You’ll hear it made a bit of difference, but not a huge amount. If you use the bigger potentiometers that I link to below, You’ll notice a much bigger difference. Now I’ll turn it right off
[CLICK] and when I hit the button you’ll hear…. nothing. And that’s a beautiful sound. If you found this useful give it a thumbs up below and let me know in the comments. Also subscribe to my channel if you want to see what my next projects are going to be.

4 comments on “Stop Your Treadmill From Beeping DIY

  1. Eileen M. O'Grady Post author

    My pug is so happy that I disconnected the beep! She's deathly afraid of the sound – freaks out when the smoke alarms beep. First time I ever ventured around a circuit board. You are a pug-saver!!!!

    Reply
  2. TTT Prank Calls Post author

    I have a 20 year old Life Fitness elliptical that has beeps that have gone haywire. They beep intermittently with no rhyme or reason. Sometimes I can ride for 4 – 10 minutes with no beeps. Other times it randomly beeps 1 to 12 times. Otherwise it works normally. I suspect that a capacitor leading to the beeper is dried out. I wonder if replacing a capacitor would fix it.

    Reply

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