Go4Life Month 2018 Fitness Demonstration

Go4Life Month 2018 Fitness Demonstration


STEPHANIE DAILEY: Hello, everybody. We’re a little bit late, but we’re here. Welcome so much. Welcome to you from the campus of the National
Institutes of Health. Welcome to the Go4Life Month Facebook live
event. My name is Stephanie Dailey and I’m Director
of Go4Life. Go4Life is the campaign from the National
Institute on Aging at NIH to get older adults to exercise and fit exercise into their everyday
lives. Once again, we’re live from the NIH campus
just outside of Washington, D.C. And why are we doing this event today? Well, every September we celebrate Go4Life
Month which is a chance to shine a spotlight, a national spotlight, on the importance of
exercise and physical activity for healthy aging. This year’s theme — get ready for it — is Get Ready! Get Moving! and Go4Life! And around the country, we have about a hundred
partners, federal partners, national partners, local partners, regional partners, who are
working with the older adults they serve to bring exercise to them, either getting people
off the couch who don’t exercise, making those inconsistent exercisers do it more consistently
or for those who are already exercising all the time, to make them stick with it. So exercise is really the highlight of the
month for our partners and for those who are involved with our partners. Also, people who are not partners can also
participate in Go4Life Month. We have a toolkit online on our website. Our website is Go4Life. Just go to Google and type in go, the number
four, life, and you’re there. On the homepage is a wonderful toolkit loaded
with activities, activity suggestions for the month. So you too can become an involved in Go4Life
Month. If you just joined us, my name is Stephanie
Dailey and we’re coming to you live from the campus of the National Institutes of Health. And I’m Director of the Go4Life campaign. Our campaign focuses on encouraging older
adults to fit exercise into their everyday lives. If you want to post comments and questions
on Facebook, please do so. Or if you’re on Twitter, just follow the hashtag
Go4Life Month. Now, what’s the focus of today’s event? It is a fitness demonstration and discussion
of the four exercises that Go4Life recommends that older adults should do. Those exercises are endurance, which some
people know as aerobic, strength, balance and flexibility. The exercises will be demonstrated by four
employees of the National Institutes of Health, older employees, ably assisted by a fitness
instructor from the NIH Fitness Center. We will focus on doing the exercises safely
and focus on doing them in a more challenging way as well. A bit of safety information. If you are at home right now watching us,
you can feel free to follow along. But you can also feel free to just relax and
watch us because these same exercises are available on our website. Again, Go4Life at Google, go, the number four,
life. And you can do them there following videos
or following photographic images of the exercises with detailed instructions as to how to do
them. If anything feels uncomfortable to you today
that you want to try, don’t do it. Just sit back and watch and relax. Also, one other point. Why am I wearing these hood covers around
my shoes? We’re in a room here at the National Institutes
of Health which doesn’t allow us to walk with shoes on these sensitive mats here. So when you do your exercises, you do not
have to wear foot covers and basically you should not wear foot covers. Just keep your sneakers on. Alright, I want to start now. Let me start by calling in our wonderful fitness
instructor Shannon. Come on in, Shannon. Hi, Shannon. SHANNON: Thank you. Thank you for letting me join you here today. STEPHANIE DAILEY: Thank you so much for being
here. We’re really looking forward to benefiting
from your years of experience working with older adults as a fitness trainer. Shannon, let me ask you to start out by asking
this question. Why do you think older adults should exercise? SHANNON: Well, I’m glad you asked this. I just want to let you know our body is governed
by the law of inertia. So a body motion stays in motion. And staying active as we age is probably the
most critical way to drive good health as we age. So a body in motion stays in motion, inertia. STEPHANIE: That’s wonderful. I said we’re going to focus on two different
aspects of exercise, the safety part and the challenge part. Part first of all, the safety part. Many older adults are reluctant to exercise
because they’re afraid of injuring themselves. What can you say about that. SHANNON: Actually, I really am so happy you
brought this up. There are three points I’d love every adult
to remember when they start a fitness regimen. The first is that if you have existing health
challenges, always make sure to consult your doctor before starting an exercise program. The second is two F’s, form and focus. Always focus and get your head in the game. And focus on executing in proper form. And the third is warm-up. Start slowly, warm up and give the body a
chance to get used to the exercise. STEPHANIE: Those are excellent tips. Tips and now the second part — challenge. People are exercising and they’re doing okay. They feel fine. Why should they up their exercise game? Why should they change what they’re doing? SHANNON: I love that you’re asking this. The body loves and responds to a challenge. It keeps you motivated, number one. And as we constantly challenge the body, focus
on proper form, executing proper form and we constantly challenge the body, we’re going
to see benefits in all four tenets here — endurance, strength, balance and flexibility. STEPHANIE: Wonderful So it’s a point of motivation too, to get
people going. SHANNON: Absolutely, absolutely, Stephanie. STEPHANIE DAILEY: When you see these results,
you want to do more. SHANNON: That’s right. STEPHANIE DAILEY: Excellent, excellent. Thank you so much for those wonderful answers,
responses. And now I want to start with our first exerciser,
John. Come on up, John. JOHN: Hello ladies, how are you? STEPHANIE DAILEY: Hey, John. How are you? Nice to see you. JOHN: Nice to see you. STEPHANIE DAILEY: John is going to demonstrate
endurance exercise. Now, endurance exercise, as I said before,
is the aerobic kind of exercise. It gets your heart breathing, gets your lungs
functioning better. And you often break a sweat when you’re doing
endurance exercises. Examples are biking, swimming, jogging and
brisk walking, not just strolling, but brisk walking. That will build your endurance. And when your endurance is strong, you can
do things like push your grandkids in swings, in a swing more easily. Or you can walk up a hill without getting
out of breath. It’s a very, very important part of exercise,
endurance. And so John’s now going to demonstrate for
us something you can do right in the comfort of your own home. JOHN: So, I’m John. And my father was a diabetic with high blood
pressure. And my adult life has been spent trying to
both solve the problem of obesity in my own lab at the NIH here and also trying to sort
of model that behavior by exercising. And really that’s a tribute to my father who
unfortunately suffered from both of those maladies. STEPHANIE: And how have you found that exercise
has benefitted your life? JOHN: Well, I’ve been a constant exerciser
since my 20s. And I believe it’s made me — certainly increased
my ability to focus, increased my ability to interact with people and certainly made
me a happier person. STEPHANIE DAILEY: That’s fabulous. And see how you’re smiling. You’re demonstrating this wonderfully, yes. Okay, good. Well, let’s take you to the exercise chair. Shannon, take it away. JOHN: Okay. SHANNON: Great. So John, you’re going to start with your feet
ground, hip-width apart and we’re going to start by walking in place. So, start out slowly walking in place. So the head, neck and back are nice and straight
from tip to chin. Good. Keeping the thoracic spine nice and straight. Nice. Using your breath. And so as John progresses movement, he may
pull his legs up a little bit more to a right angle to the torso, again driving stability
keeping the chin up, thoracic spine straight and bracing through the upper body. John, you ready to up the ante a bit here? JOHN: Absolutely. SHANNON: All right. When you’re ready, I want you to maybe put
your hands above your head, moving your hands. Good, beautiful. Using the breath, John is raising endurance
happily here. Beautiful. How does that feel? JOHN: Absolutely good. SHANNON: Good. JOHN: When are we going to stop? [laughter] SHANNON: You’re able to carry on conversation. All right. Beautiful job, John. Thank you. JOHN: Thank you. STEPHANIE DAILEY: Thank you so much. Thank you for that wonderful story. You know, what John was doing is something
that you can do right in the comfort of your own home, watching television, for example,
or if not the whole program, at least for the commercial breaks. So people think you’ve got to go outside to
do endurance. You’ve got to go out and run. That’s all wonderful. But if it’s a rainy day, if it’s a snowy day,
if it’s a hot day, if you don’t want to go outside, you can do it right in the comfort
of your own home. And you will get your heart rate up, break
a sweat and you’ve done some endurance. So, our next exerciser is Leslie who’s going
to be demonstrating strength exercises. First, a little bit about strength exercises
and then I’ll ask Leslie to share her story. Strength exercises are exercises that build
muscle basically. They build muscle. And examples are squats, leg lifts, arm curls,
often done with resistance, with weights or your own body resistance. The stronger you become, the more likely it
is that you’ll be able to climb stairs with ease or open a jar more easily or carry groceries
more easily. It has a direct impact on the functions of
everyday life. So it’s very important. So Leslie, before we have you demonstrate
a strength exercise, tell us how exercise has impacted your life. LESLIE: Okay. I was a pretty athletic kid. I was a swimmer on a swim team at age eight
and went to the Junior Olympics. And when I was kind of done with swimming,
I was also a tennis player. And then I was running and playing soccer
and I liked it all. So I was at a gym and it was bought out by
somebody else. And in 2011, I lost my full-time membership. And a few years before that, I was doing a
whole lot of caregiving for my mom and I just wasn’t keeping up with taking care of myself. And I had sciatica three times between 2012
and 2016 and it was terrible. And it always came on right in the summer
when I really wanted to do stuff. So I said this has to stop. And I thought what can I do? And I found a program that’s at 7 o’clock
every morning on MPT TV. And it is strengthening and stretching. And I love it. And it’s kept me much healthier. And then I also come to the NIH gym. STEPHANIE DAILEY: And Leslie, you said to
me – Leslie’s going to be the inspiration for this Facebook live event. We were talking about this about two months
ago walking to lunch together. And you said that stretching has helped you
with other exercise, right? LESLIE: Oh, yeah. I mean, everything – well, for one thing
I need my circulation to move. I’m a little older. I’m not real old. [laughter] I do like to not feel stiff and I do need
to stretch in the morning or I sometimes feel a little stiff. And if you get your stiffness out, then you
can move. Then you can do everything else for the rest
of the day. STEPHANIE DAILEY: Well, wonderful. So you’re going to demonstrate strength
exercises for us. So take it away. SHANNON: So, Stephanie’s going to sit in
the chair. For those of you that are chair bound and
potentially wheelchair bound, I want to make one note. Leslie’s going to use weights here. But you can use household items such as a
water bottle or something a little heavier to be able to do that if you also don’t have
weights. So what we’re going to do is sitting overhead
press for those that are chair bound or potentially wheelchair-bound. Let’s start with an overhead extension. And Leslie has beautiful form. She’s going to come to a right angle with
the breath and exhale push up into the exertion. So you’re exhaling on the exertion, inhaling
right into the right angle. And she’s using the breath. She’s coming to shoulder height, but she is
appreciating the planes of the body. The body has geometric planes. And staying within the planes of the body
can drive safety in the movement. We want to make sure when you guys are doing
the sitting overhead press, you’re using a stable chair on the floor. So generally, make sure you’ve got a flat
surface. And how does that feel? LESLIE: Great. Love it. SHANNON: So her upper back is braced. Her chin is lifted. And she’s just working a sitting overhead
press here to drive and strengthen the upper body. LESLIE: And you can do this at home with cans. SHANNON: Cans, right? Cans. Or water bottles. LESLIE: Yeah. SHANNON: So you ready to up the ante, Leslie? LESLIE: Definitely. SHANNON: Okay, beautiful. Let’s press through the feet and come out
standing. You’re standing hip width apart. So you’re building it from the ground up. The glutes are engaged to drive stability
in the lower body. Let’s extend the hands. Do you want to try it with the bottles? Or you’re good with the weights? LESLIE: Weights first. SHANNON: Okay, beautiful. Okay, let’s come to a right angle. Good. Good. And so just keeping the thoracic spine straight,
the chin doesn’t dip. And she’s building it from the ground up,
nice stable base. And the hips actually float right under the
rib cage in terms of form. Her glutes are engaged to drive stability
in the lower body as she does this. This is a progression. Standing overhead press can do it sitting
down or standing up to progress it. LESLIE: And you can graduate to heavier. SHANNON: Heavier weights. Right. Beautiful. LESLIE: I’m going to do the lighter ones. SHANNON: Lighter ones. LESLIE: Because I’m finishing up. [laughter] SHANNON: You are good with those water bottles. LESLIE: They feel good too. STEPHANIE DAILEY: Yeah, water bottles or cans
like Leslie said or even bags of beans, things you have around the house. You don’t necessarily have to spend the money
to be fit at home. SHANNON: But Stephanie, I just want to make
sure Leslie is — we’re all focused on proper form, executing in proper form. If she can execute in proper form, she can
increase the amount of weight she’s actually using. STEPHANIE DAILEY: Wonderful. Thank you, Leslie. SHANNON: All right. Beautiful job. Thank you, Leslie. STEPHANIE DAILEY: Wonderful. The next one is balance. And we’re going to have Betty for balance,
I mean, Nancy for balance. I did this before in the rehearsal. Her name is Nancy. And balance exercises are very important because
they do one thing really well. They help prevent falls. And we know as we get older that a fall can
be devastating. And balance is the ability to keep yourself,
keep your body, intact, whether you are moving or still as in the standing position. So that as we get older, that can become compromised. Balance exercises include things like stand
on one foot, heel to toe walk and Tai Chi has been proven to be very good for balance
for older adults. So Nancy’s going to show us now a balance
exercise. But first I want to ask you how has exercise
impacted your — what is your exercise story? NANCY: I have a story that’s very compelling
and I’ll explain why exercise is important to me. When I was a teenager, I developed a passion
for tennis. I used power as a basis of my game. And as a result of that, I got a number of
tennis associated injuries. At one physical therapy session, the therapist
told me the importance of getting into shape in order to play tennis. So I took his advice and I began weight training
and yoga. And after that, I no longer had any more tennis
associated injuries. When I turned sixty, I came down with rheumatoid
arthritis. Within a month, I lost ten pounds. I became severely disabled. I just aged tremendously. So I decided that I had to do something about
it. My friends would say to me don’t you miss
tennis? And I would say I just wanted to be able to
walk again. So I began exercising as soon as I was able
to. And as a result, I regained my strength, my
flexibility, my mobility and balance. While I still have rheumatoid arthritis and
osteoarthritis, I can live a pain-free life because I’m dedicated to exercise. STEPHANIE DAILEY: That is such a wonderful
story. SHANNON: It is. STEPHANIE DAILEY: Very inspiring. SHANNON: It is. STEPHANIE DAILEY: This is fabulous. Thank you so much for being able to share
that with us. And I’m not going to ask you how old you are,
but you’re older than sixty. She started at sixty, folks. That’s the message. You can start at whatever age you want to. It’s never too late. And look at her. She’s in great shape. It looks wonderful. So now we’re going to take you to a balance
exercise that will help you. SHANNON: Okay, beautiful. So we’re going to start Nancy with the same
chair again, a stable chair on the ground. Nancy, we’re just going to do one leg lifts. I want you to come long in the head, neck
and back. Good. Building it from the ground up. Your thoracic spine stays nice and straight. Good. And the chin doesn’t dip. We’re holding it for about ten seconds here,
one leg is up. Now, notice she has both hands ground to drive
stability in the body. Okay, exhale. Let’s bring that leg down and let’s switch
it out with the opposite one. Paying attention to asymmetries in the body
and actually working through those asymmetries over time with your fitness regime to try
to bring them more symmetrical. Good. How are you feeling here? NANCY: Okay. SHANNON: Beautiful, wonderful. Working that stability. So Nancy’s going to demonstrate a progression. Exhale. Please place down. We’re going to come up on — she’s using one
hand now. So she started with two, driving stability,
building it the ground up. She’s strengthened through her midline and
her chin is lifted. Notice her head is up. The body follows the head. Beautiful. Nice job, Nancy. Let’s switch to the opposite. Good breathing. She’s using her breath to drive stability
from the ground up and then slowing the breath to actually slow it down and stay stable. You ready to try with no hands maybe? Let’s try it with no hands. Head, neck and back. Good. Ta-dah. Using the breath. Nice. Beautiful, Nancy. Let’s try the opposite side. Let’s try the opposite side. Build it from the ground up. Start to steady. Head up, heart up, chest lifts. Wonderful, amazing. [clapping] STEPHANIE DAILEY: Thank you so much, Nancy. Well, now we’re going to call up one more
exerciser for the last exercise. Last but not least, that is flexibility. So come on down, Tara. This is Tara. TARA: Well, hello Stephanie. STEPHANIE DAILEY: How you doing? How you doing? Thank you so much for being here. TARA: All right. STEPHANIE DAILEY: Tara’s going to demonstrate
flexibility. Flexibility, of course, is stretching. You can do neck stretches. You can do ankle stretches. You can do leg stretches. And yoga, of course, is a wonderful stretching
exercise. When you’re more limber, you have greater
range of motion you can do things like bend down and pick up the newspaper off the front
porch more easily, put your socks on more easily, your stockings on more easily, put
on a sweater or an overcoat more easily. Lots of things you can do. Feel less stiff when you get out of bed. Those are some of the benefits of flexibility. And it’s often given short shrift in exercise. People work out a lot. They do five minutes of flexibility at the
end. Flexibility is very, very important. And Tara’s going to show us just how. Tara, could you tell us your exercise story? Why is exercise so important to you? And how has it benefited your life? TARA: Well, when I was in high school, I was
on the track team. So I ran track. And I was on the football team. So I always was exercising. Then after graduating from high school, I
went to the Marine Corps where I was reborn. And being there, you’re training every day. And actually, they train you to the point
where you feel like if you don’t train, if you don’t strengthen, then you’re not ready
for the next day, you’re not ready for the next mission. So I’m always ready for the next mission. Back in I think it was in 1990, I was diagnosed
with colitis. And during that period, I was having health
issues. And right then, I said, look. We’re going to do this on a daily routine
basis. So I try to get it in six days a week. But it’s working and I see the results. So that’s why I do what I do. STEPHANIE DAILEY: Fabulous. Fabulous story. Wonderful. Well, why don’t we start with the flexibility
exercise you’re going to be doing. You’re going to be doing it on the ground. TARA: Yeah. STEPHANIE DAILEY: Take it away, Shannon. SHANNON: Right. So Tara’s going to be stretching his hamstrings. So let’s come down to the ground. Good. All right. He’s laying in a supine position on his back. He’s going to draw his left knee up, bend
his left knee. And you’re going to actually ground it there. All right. We’re going to extend the right leg toward
the ceiling. We’re going to extend the right leg. So keeping the leg bound. Good, good. And gently straightening through your leg. So one of the things that we’re seeing a lot
is that constant sitting tightens the hamstrings and they happen to really pull on the lower
back if you’re not careful. So Tara’s using his breath slowing. So he’s going to keep his neck flat into the
mat, right? And he’s going to use his breath. Maybe you can reach up and grab the leg, grab
the leg out the shin, keeping the neck, not arching the head and using the breath to drive
some elasticity in the muscles that run up the back of the legs. Beautiful. It feels good, huh? TARA: Yes, it does. SHANNON: Define feels good. TARA: Pain is good. SHANNON: Well, sometimes. STEPHANIE DAILEY: Not really. SHANNON: Yeah. So really being careful with these muscles,
driving the elasticity will really help the lower back. Because tight hamstrings tend to pull the
torso backward. Okay, beautiful job. Are you ready to try the opposite leg? TARA: Yes, we are. SHANNON: All right. We’re going to engage the core when you release. Good. Now, this time pull that knee up, bending
the knee. Good. And then extending the opposite leg. So Tara is actually doing the supported hamstring
stretch. This just bending the knee on one side supports
the hamstring. Are you ready to reach up and grab just gently? Gently. Not ever pulling on the muscles and using
the breath to kind of relax. The neck stays down. Try not to arch the head, thoracic spine ground
into the mat. As Tara gets more flexible, there is an option
to extend the opposite leg. But this is a little more supportive for the
low back here. How’s it feel? TARA: Good. SHANNON: Enjoying this? TARA: Yeah. SHANNON: Ready to bring this to the Marines? TARA: Yeah. SHANNON: Okay. Beautiful job. Thank you. Amazing stretching there. STEPHANIE DAILEY: Thank you, Tara. Wonderful. Beautiful. Thank you. Well, this has just been wonderful. You’ve seen here demonstrated four different
types of exercises, the four that are recommended for older adults, endurance, strength, balance
and flexibility, by employees of the National Institutes of Health, ably assisted by our
a wonderful NIH trainer, fitness trainer. And you’ve seen that we’ve heard their poignant
and very impactful exercise stories as well, telling you just how exercises has impacted
their lives and has benefited their lives and has infused itself into their lives. So it’s become a part of their lives. And so we’d like you to join us in celebrating
Go4Life Month and to go to the website. Again, go, the number four, life, on the web
and you’ll be there. And to check our toolkit out and try some
exercises yourself for this month. And so before we end, I’d like to call everybody
back up and take a final bow for work well done. And we’ll put those foot covers back on our
shoes so that we can make sure that we don’t ruin the mat here. And we’re not going to do a Rockettes line. We’re just going to sit here. I want to thank John, Leslie, Nancy, Shannon
and Tara for being such wonderful participants in this wonderful Go4Life Month celebration. I’m Stephanie Daly and I’m thanking you very
much for joining us. And go out and Get Ready! Get moving! Go4Life!

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