FBI Physical Fitness Test (PFT) Protocol

FBI Physical Fitness Test (PFT) Protocol


♪ ♪ I’m Special
Agent Jennifer Schick. I’m an instructor at
the physical training unit at the FBI Academy
here in Quantico, Virginia. My unit is responsible for
all of the defensive tactics and physical fitness training
for the new agent trainees during their
time at the Academy. The new agent training program presents trainees
with myriad rigorous physical and mental challenges. The physical
fitness test, or PFT, is a comprehensive measure
of the physical readiness of individuals wishing to become
Special Agents of the FBI. The PFT is
comprised of five events. The first event
is the sit-up event. The second event is
the 300-meter sprint. The third event is
the push-up event. The fourth event
is the 1.5-mile run. The scores of
these first four events are combined to
determine whether or not an individual passes the PFT. The fifth event is
the pull-up event. This event is not
considered when determining whether or not an
individual passes the PFT unless he or she is an applicant
under the tactical program. However, the pull-up
event will be considered when determining the recipients
of physical fitness awards. An individual must
score at least one point in each of the first four events with a minimum
cumulative score of 12 points in order to pass the PFT. An individual under
the tactical program must score a minimum of
one point in all five events with a minimum
cumulative score of 20 points. We will now
explain and demonstrate the proper protocol
for each event of the PFT. MALE: Participant lies on back with tops of shoulder
blades touching the floor, arms crossed over chest
with the fingers in contact with the tops of the
shoulders, trapezius muscles, or seams on some t-shirts. The knees are bent
in a 90-degree angle with the feet
placed flat on the floor. Feet are held in
place by a partner, with the partner’s
hands at the tongue of the participant’s shoes. The holder’s knees may be placed
on the participant’s toes. Participant raises upper body until the elbows
touch mid-thigh. Participant then returns
to the starting position, meaning the tops of the shoulder
blades must touch the floor to complete the repetition. Hips must remain in
contact with the ground throughout the repetition. This is a timed one-minute
continuous-motion exercise. Incorrect sit-ups
that will not be counted: Elbows do not touch mid-thigh at the top of
the sit-up exercise. [buzzer sound] Tops of the shoulder
blades do not touch the floor at the bottom of
the sit-up exercise. [buzzer sound] Hands move off of the
tops of the shoulders. [buzzer sound] Hand on collarbone is too low. [buzzer sound] Hands pulling on shirt. [buzzer sound] Hips do not stay in
contact with the floor. [buzzer sound] Not maintaining
90-degree angle at the knees. [buzzer sound] Resting between repetitions. [buzzer sound] The second event is
the 300-meter sprint. This event takes place
on a 400-meter oval track. The runners will begin
in their designated lanes from a standing position. On the command to begin,
the runners will run 300 meters or three-quarters of
the way around the track at maximum speed. The runners must stay
in their designated lane throughout the entire event. Runners, ready? Set? Go! The third event is
the push-up event. This is a
continuous-motion exercise, but it is untimed. The exerciser will start in
the front-leaning rest position with his elbows fully extended
and away from his body, his toes on the ground no
more than three inches apart and his body in a straight
line from his head to his feet. The hands will be placed on
the ground, fingers forward, slightly outside
of shoulder width or up to two hand-widths
outside of the shoulders. On the command to begin, the exerciser
will lower his body until the center axis of
the elbow is in a straight line with the center axis of the
shoulder parallel to the ground. He will then push back
up to the starting position until his elbows
are fully locked out, keeping his body in a straight
line throughout the exercise. This is one repetition. The exerciser will demonstrate
a few good repetitions. Some common mistakes are: not lowering far enough,
so the elbow and shoulder do not form a straight
line parallel to the ground; not fully
locking out the elbows; or not moving the
body as one unit, maintaining that straight line. Any of these mistakes occur, these
repetitions will not count. Again, this is a
continuous-motion exercise, so if at any time the
exerciser pauses to rest, the exercise will be terminated. The fourth event
is the 1.5-mile run. This also takes place on
a quarter-mile oval track. On the command to begin, the
runners will start on the track and run six laps
around that track. This is an individual event, so the runners are not
permitted to pace other runners during the event. Runners must stay on the track throughout the entire event. The fifth event is
the pull-up event. This is a continuous-motion
untimed exercise. On the command to mount the bar, the exerciser will grasp
the bar with an overhand grip, palms facing out, with hands
at least shoulder-width apart and no further
than 23 inches apart as measured to the
outside of the hand. The exercise will begin
from a dead hang position. On the command to begin, the
exerciser will pull himself up until his chin clears the bar and lower back down
to a dead hang position where his elbows are locked out. That is one repetition. The exerciser is
not permitted to kick or move his body
to generate momentum in an effort to pull himself up. A partner may be
needed to hold an arm out in front of the body to prevent
it from swaying back and forth. The exerciser will demonstrate
a few good repetitions. Some common mistakes are: not pulling
himself up high enough so the chin does
not clear the bar; not lowering
himself down all the way until the elbows are locked out; or kicking to generate momentum. If any of these mistakes occur, the repetition will not count. This is a
continuous-motion exercise, so if at any time the
exerciser stops to rest, the exercise will be terminated. The last repetition must
finish at a dead hang position before the
exerciser dismounts the bar, or that final
repetition will not count. I’m Blitz Gradehouse [phonetic], the FBI’s physical
fitness program manager. It is my
responsibility to ensure that the FBI’s
physical fitness test, the PFT, is administered consistently across all 56 FBI field offices and that it is administered
in strict accordance with the exercise protocols demonstrated for
you on this video. The men and women who administer
the physical fitness test are experienced FBI agents who have received
specialized training to prepare them for
this important task. They have a full understanding
of the exercise protocols, and they will only count those
sit-ups, push-ups and pull-ups that you perform correctly. Therefore, it is
incumbent upon you to familiarize
yourself with these protocols and to train accordingly. As you have seen
from this video, the new agent training
program at the FBI Academy is extremely rigorous. You are expected to
arrive at the Academy in peak physical condition so that you are able to meet any
and all challenges you face. Your physical
condition is one aspect of the application process that
you have complete control over. Your performance on
the physical fitness test is an excellent
measure of your character and tells us your desire
to be a part of the FBI. Therefore, when training
for the physical fitness test, don’t aim for the
minimum passing score. Push yourself to achieve
the maximum possible score on each and every event. The PFT is not a
test you can cram for. You need to start
training well in advance and to train with intensity. If you put the time
and effort in up front, you will perform
well on the PFT. And more importantly, you
will be physically prepared for entry into the FBI Academy. Our intent in
putting this video together was to give you a better
understanding of the FBI’s physical fitness test and to make you
aware of the need to be physically prepared for
the new agent training program. The desire, dedication
and hard work necessary to excel on the PFT
and to achieve your goal of becoming a
Special Agent of the FBI is up to you.

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