Deborah’s Workout: Part 2 – Upper Body Exercises

Deborah’s Workout: Part 2 – Upper Body Exercises


In the last video we met Debrorah An active lady in her late 40’s who was told by her doctor that she has a low bone mineral density and is at moderate risk for fractures. To maintain her bone mineral density Her doctor recommended learning some exercises from a Kinesiologist or a Certified Exercise Physiologist. This is someone with a 4 year university degree related to the science of human movement. Look for someone with specialized training in designing exercise programs for people with osteoporosis from Bone Fit or the Canadian Society for Exercise Physiology. Physical Therapists can also take this training and design exercise programs. Deborah has made a great start with her lower body and core exercises. Now we will work on her upper body beginning with push ups from the knees. When doing a push up its important to get into the position safely. If you have knee trouble make sure you put a mat or a cushion under your knees. Bring one foot forward keeping your head and back in alignment and come into a lunge position lowering the back of the knee onto the floor. Bring the other knee onto the floor. Hinging at the hips reach forward to place one hand on the floor and then the other. Slowly walk your hands in front of you until your hands and just wider than your shoulders. Your knees, hips, and shoulders should create a straight line. Bring your belly button in towards your spine to stabilize your core before doing the exercise. Lower your body down to the floor by bending at the elbows and the shoulders keeping your hips and shoulders in line. You want to maintain this position throughout the whole push up. Do not touch the floor with your chest. Push through your hands to bring yourself back to the starting position on your hands and knees with your back straight. From the push up we’ll progress into a lat pull down with a machine or an exercise band. Select a weigh that’s appropriate for you. Grab a hold of the bar overhead with your hands just past the bend in the bar and your palms facing out. Palms facing you has your biceps and back working together palms facing out targets your back muscles more. Pull the bar down as you sit down. Bring your belly button in towards your spine to stabilize your core before doing the exercise. Pull the bar down bringing your elbows towards your waist. The bar should come down just above your chest. Slowly allow the bar to go back up using your back muscles to control the speed to a count of 4. To do it with an exercise band, hold the band with arms over head and the band slightly taut. Draw your belly button in towards your spine to stabilize your core. Bring your elbows down towards your waist. Slowly straighten your arms back to the starting position. Our upper body workout will continue with an upright kettle bell row. Hold a kettle bell in front of you with both hands, arms straight keeping the weight close to your body. Bring your belly button in towards your spine to stabilize your core before doing the exercise. Slowly draw the kettle bell up keeping it close your your body until your upper arms are parallel to the floor and the kettle bell is just above your belly. Slowly lower the kettle bell to the starting position. These exercises don’t take long. In Deborah’s case she started with 5 strength exercises and 1 for her back extensors. It only takes about 30 minutes 3 times a week. We also helped her develop and action plan. Her schedule includes going to the gym on Monday and Wednesday evenings as well as Saturday mornings to do strength training. We also wrote down a back up plan. If she has to work late one day, Thursday is an alternate day. Or the exercises can be done at home with weights and an exercise band. What will you add to your exercise action plan right now? Call us and tell us about it. Or post a note or a picture on Facebook or Twitter with the #toofittofracture.

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